by Ed Higgins


While irrelevant, the weather man, an expert afterall, explained freezing rain as supercooled raindrops passing through a subfreezing layer of air and then freezing with the impact of a 18-wheeler jack-knifed into a Mini-Cooper as it hits the surface. Any surface. 


Travel can become difficult. As in life's juggernaut. Weathering it, that is. But life's always been difficult, according to observations of some philosophers. Notoriously for the poor, although they seldom drive Mini-Coopers. Lucky for them, particularly in bad weathering. 


“The difficulty in life is the choice,” according to the English philosopher George Moore. Although not saying between what. Yet offering common sense proof of an external world: raising his right hand, “Here is one hand,” then his left, “And here is another.” Moore knew in what direction cool was blowing. 


He further asserted: “It will rain but I don't believe it will.” Wittgenstein thought this paradox impressive philosophical insight: whenever one is wrong about the whether forecast. 


Still, life goes on. For some. Not for others, dreamless in that long sleep.