Forum / LGBT Poets

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    Philip F. Clark
    Apr 03, 03:49am

    I would like very much to connect to other LGBT poets and writers who are exploring our lives and experience in literature and poetry in all genres. I welcome your connection with my work, and I look forward to the opportunity to read yours. Every good wish.

    Philip F Clark

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    Arturo Ruiz
    Apr 03, 02:37pm

    Hi Philip!

    I'm here with you. My subject matter isn't always queer, per se, but I like to think my style/approach is.

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    Philip F. Clark
    Apr 03, 08:52pm

    Style and approach is good -- actually, I should have said LGBT and LGBT Supportive.

  • Samuel Derrick Rosen
    Apr 03, 08:58pm

    Philip, I was going to make a joke and say you left out all the other letters.

    Arturo, I wouldn't say your style/approach is queer, feminine would be more accurate. A friend of mine is a feminine writer and sometimes find myself envying parts of his work, most likely due to the fact I am a masculine writer and the grass and the fence thingie.

    I sometimes have tried to write in a feminine style but always feel like I've failed, IDK, maybe I've succeeded here and there.

  • Samuel Derrick Rosen
    Apr 03, 08:59pm

    I did end a poem on a feminine stress.

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    Arturo Ruiz
    Apr 03, 09:23pm

    Oh totally, SDR, I can see that about my stuff. Although a man writing in a feminine mode is definitely one definition of queer. Style-wise, it may also maniifest as the disregard for traditional shapes or patterns (Gertrude Stein), or on the opposite spectrum embrace of hyperformalism (Thom Gunn). Usually there's also a tendency toward the dramatic or spectacular (Walt Whitman or Frank OHara). And also the sense of being a stranger. Of course, these are generalities -- no one ever fits neatly in a box.

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    Iain James Robb
    Apr 14, 03:15pm

    I'm not a lesbian. I'm a man, and I'm not even homosexual, but twice I've written poems with gay woman narrators and both are up here. They are Calypso and Upwards, Into the White Eye Rising. The reason they have lesbian narrators is very simple. Those were the themes I had to work with, and my stuff is just art for art's sake. But switching identity when you're writing does open up the way to certain poetic perspectives, because you're trying to write according to a differing psychology.

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