Henry E. Powderly II


Location Saint James, NY
Occupation Web editor
Website http://henrypowderly.com
IM (GTalk) henry.powderly

About Me

I'm a thirtysomething writer and jazz musician who's trying desperately not to lose his creative mojo in the wake of day job pressures. It's not a unique scenario, but it's nonetheless my reality.

I often wish I were more prolific. I'm not a writer who hones his craft every day, but that doesn't mean I'm not an artist. Most of my writing efforts for the past nine years have been on my two novels. The first, called The Host, I wrote three times, clinging to it on the dream of making it big. At last I realized that it really isn't that good, like many first novels are, so I've allowed myself to let it collect dust. My second, called Imaginary Bebop, needs a hard edit/rewrite which I hope to complete within the next few years. Meanwhile, I'm trying to pen a stronger collection of poems and short prose pieces right now.

I love music, jazz, classical, indie, world. I play saxophone and piano, and have played professionally in New York City and multiple venues in the Hudson Valley of New York.

I am also married and my first child, a baby girl born in May 2009, has completely redefined love for me.

Why do you write?

I guess I just want to tell stories that people pull some kind of meaning out of.

Any favorite authors? Books?

Favorite authors: Henry Miller is tops. From the carnal to the highest sense of emotional intellect and everything in between. For me, that's all there is.

Haruki Murakami is a recent find, and he teaches me how a wild imagination can still tell a beautiful, digestible story.

And, Nikos Kazantzakis, because there is no prose more beautiful than his.

Henry E. Powderly II's Wall

Doug Bond – Nov 12, 2009

Hi Henry...thanks for your comments.
Check out Murakami's little book about running,(What I Talk About When I Talk About Running)...it's a wonderful window into him, perhaps how he keeps that wild imagination cooking on such an even keel.

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